Can osteoporosis be secondary to an endocrine disorder?

Which endocrine disorders can have a complication of osteoporosis?

Disorders of the endocrine system, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency, Cushing’s syndrome, and anorexia nervosa frequently cause secondary osteoporosis.

What is Endocrinology osteoporosis?

Endocrinologists specialize in treating and preventing bone loss and preventing fractures. In addition, endocrinologists treat disorders that may affect bones, such as hyperparathyroidism, low and high levels of calcium. Become familiar with osteoporosis risk factors.

Why would I see an endocrinologist for osteoporosis?

If your doctor has diagnosed you with osteoporosis or you’ve had fragility fractures of the spine or hip, you may be referred to an endocrinologist to confirm the diagnosis. Testing will be completed to look for other medical conditions that lead to bone loss, determine its severity, and select the best treatment.

What is the best doctor to see for osteoporosis?

Rheumatologists treat patients with age-related bone diseases. They can diagnose and treat osteoporosis. Endocrinologists, who see patients with hormone-related issues, also manage the treatment of metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis. Orthopedic surgeons may fix fractures.

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What is the effect of hormonal imbalance in osteoporosis?

Bone loss accelerates after menopause, when older women have a quick drop in estrogen. Over time, the risk of osteoporosis and fracture increases as older women lose more bone than they replace.

What is the leading cause of osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is more likely to occur in people who have: Low calcium intake. A lifelong lack of calcium plays a role in the development of osteoporosis. Low calcium intake contributes to diminished bone density, early bone loss and an increased risk of fractures.

How does estrogen affect osteoporosis?

Women tend to have smaller, thinner bones than men. Estrogen, a hormone in women that protects bones, decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. This is why the chance of developing osteoporosis increases as women reach menopause.

What are the two types of osteoporosis?

Two categories of osteoporosis have been identified: primary and secondary. Primary osteoporosis is the most common form of the disease and includes postmenopausal osteoporosis (type I), and senile osteoporosis (type II). Secondary osteoporosis is characterized as having a clearly definable etiologic mechanism.

Can secondary osteoporosis be cured?

Much like primary osteoporosis, there is no cure for secondary osteoporosis. Treatment for secondary osteoporosis can be a little more complex and depends on the underlying condition. Treatment of secondary osteoporosis is also aimed at preventing bone loss, fractures, and disability as well as controlling pain.

What is secondary prevention of osteoporosis?

Emphasis of the primary prevention is, besides a sufficient calcium intake, to omit risk factors; with secondary prevention the use of medical treatments such as estrogens/gestagens, bisphosphonates, and recently also SERMs is applied. The tertiary prevention tries mostly to reduce the femur fractures.

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Is it better to see a rheumatologist or endocrinologist for osteoporosis?

A rheumatologist has extensive experience in treating osteoporosis. Rheumatologists see a higher volume and concentration of patients with osteoporosis, and thus are more experienced in treating the condition successfully.

Do you get bone pain with osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is not usually painful until a bone is broken, but broken bones in the spine are a common cause of long-term pain. Although a broken bone is often the first sign of osteoporosis, some older people develop the characteristic stooped (bent forward) posture.

Can osteoporosis be treated without medication?

Many people prefer not to take drugs or medications because they want to treat their osteoporosis “naturally,” but at this time, there are no herbal supplements or “natural” treatments that are proven to be both safe and effective to treat osteoporosis and prevent broken bones.